Author Archives: dixielmc

About dixielmc

Library Media Specialist @ Dixie Magnet Elementary

A few of my favorite things…

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We are one hour away from home and are reflecting on our journey.

My favorite part of our trip was:

Chetan – Williamsburg and seeing how the soldiers lived during the war.

Nick – Jamestown Settlement

Brice – the museum at Jamestown

Madison – the Indian Village

Lindy – the Ghost Walk

Taylor – Jamestown

Natalie – Colonial Williamsburg (especially the ghost walk)

Abagail – Colonial Williamsburg (especially the Dress Maker)

D’Syaa – Colonial Williamsburg (the wig maker shoppe)

Elizabeth – the ghost tour because the tour guide was amazing

Brenna – the ghost tour because the guide told so many interesting things.

Corey – Colonial Williamsburg especially the ghost tour.

Jackson – The museum at Yorktown

Azrael – all of it!

Kevin – Williamsburg. Everything about it!

Jonas – Colonial Williamsburg (Blacksmith and Gunsmith)

Jenna – going to all the different jobs and places in Williamsburg

Meghan – seeing all the Colonial characters and learning about their lives. Colonial Williamsburg in all!

Mrs Revo – Jamestown. Just seeing the beginnings of the country.

Mr Churchill – All the artifacts and replicas. Seeing how everything looked during Colonial times. Standing in bathroom lines.

Mrs Fischer – Training as a soldier in the Continental Army and Monticello. I’m ready to move in!

Mrs Watson – Seeing how excited the kids would get as they learned new information and how confident they were on their previous knowledge!

Monticello

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Morning in Monticello. Blog by Jenna – 5th grade

We have arrived in Monticello. We are going on a shuttle up to Thomas Jefferson’s house. On his house there are columns. The point is the pediment. There are six chimneys also to keep the people warm, by fire. His house was about 200 years old. His house has 33 rooms and 4 floors. He has a library in his house just for him. He has a green Hamoude with plants and birds just come to visit. He had an octagon room also named the Madison because fourth president, James Madison, and his wife, Dolly, would come and visit. It was 30 miles away but it would take 8 hours. Also out of his house he had a fish pond. They would keep fish here until they were ready to eat it. They didn’t have refrigerators.

He also grew up in shad-wile. Thomas Jefferson lived on a farm with crops and animals. He made a new plant called a hybrid which means two different things put together. His farm had an orchard, which was a part of land that had many different types of plants or trees with fruit.

He died when he was 93 years of age. He was 6 ft. 2.5 inches. He had 4 brothers.

He loved to play the violin so he would go to people’s ceremonies or parties and play for them for money. They would play a chamber in houses or palaces. He also liked to write with his polygraph. This is how he copied all I his documents. Thomas Jefferson loved science and architecture. He played the harpsichord and piano. Thomas Jefferson could also draw beautifully.

He also had slaves. They stayed all in one room. They would cook the food. Clean the house. And take care of the family. He would be nice to the slaves. He would never have problems because the slaves would be happiest slaves ever because Thomas Jefferson was as nice as possible.

At the bottom of the hill he had a garden. His slaves would take care of it. It has rows if different vegetables. A whole lot of different kinds.

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Mr. Churchill’s and Mrs. Revo’s Magic Tree House Journey

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post by E.R. ChuChu

Today we got to visit The Wren House on the campus of William and Mary.  This is the oldest active college classroom building in the United States.  it’s a majestic walk up to the building.  You pass a statue of “some guy that must be important” as Mrs. Revo puts it.  Then you walk into big green double doors that leads you into the entry way.  On the right is the Grammar School.  The old way of teaching where everybody is gathered into one room classroom.  The master of the school sits on a throne and then two assistants are located in the corner of the room in their pulpits.  Then the fun started to happen.  Mrs. Revo walked upstairs, which is not on the mapped route, so Mr. Churchill reluctantly followed.  We saw professor offices and a hallway of past presidents of the university.   Mrs. Revo pleased that she was ignorant and Mr. Churchill pleased that he was following the batty woman!  Once they walked down some stairs the lucked into finding the chapel.  Not sure if it was still active we looked at all the pews and the decorative art.  When upon exiting we found all the doors were closed and we were sure we were locked in.  At least we had the cunning Mrs. Revo on hand who was used to the colonial locks that needed those really big keys. I would hate to see the janitor’s key chain!  After a struggle of 10 minutes walking aimlessly around the chapel looking for an open door we found the key!  Just turn the handle!  So we trudged over to the banquet hall that was located as our last stop on the self-guidend adventure.  Unbeknownst to us we walked into an important meeting of adults.  They looked at us strangely and we looked back at them. Then we bolted for the nearest door and by bolt I mean a vigorous walk.  We found fresh air and sunshine in an unknown garden.  So we just followed the brick road to that statue of “that guy” we saw earlier and Mrs. Revo noted that she deserves a statue like that at Dixie Elementary.  We both had a good chuckle!

Bah! Bah! Black Sheep Have You Any “Wool”?

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post by Chetan – 4th grade

When I first went to the weaver I saw a bunch of cotton and wool sitting in a basket next to each other.  I wondered to myself what they are going to do with that.  First, she told us that they use a special tool called a spinning wheel to spin the cotton or wool into yarn or thread. They only spin the wool or cotton when they had finished their other chores and during their “break” time.  Not much of a break if you ask me!  If you wanted to have other colors than white you would have to dye it using special types of liquids like mercury (not too safe).  A chemist would have that job!   Once they started to weave the yarn and thread they used a machine called  allow.  You have to be good at math to do this part because they had different numbered pedals, up to 4, and they had to design it all out.  Kind of like our binary does they use for computers.  The loom used a special tool called a shuttle that you place the yarn and thread in to build your tapestry.  You have to “lock” it in so the shuttle doesn’t go flying through the window.  This job didn’t seem like a break and kind of repetitive to me.  One of the neat things they were working on while we were there was a curtain for George Washington’s tent while he was on the battlefield.

Life of a Cabinet Maker

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Blog by Corey – 4th Grade

They had a piano looking item that was called a harpsichord.  The harpsichord isn’t actually a piano because the strings were picked instead of using a hammer.  No matter how hard you hit the keys the sound of the harpsichord would not change, but you could change the timbre by moving the picks within the harpsichord.  They are made out of walnut found in the fields of Virginia.

Cabinet Maker Shop

Cabinet Maker Shop

They also made a desk that took over 500 man hours to make!  They typically used three men to make it.  Only the wealthy could afford this desk because it cost 10 pounds about @25,poo today.   Even the cabinet maker could not afford the desk he built.  To be a cabinet maker they were an apprentice for 7 years and then they became a journey man.  If they became a master this meant the owned the shop and all the tools within it.  Cabinet makers had to do so many other jobs to keep in business.  The made cases for clocks.  They made all the chairs to go in the house.  To make the chair they used a tool called a “wood plane” to make the chair legs smooth.  They even sold wall paper from England.  Actually they didn’t even  make cabinets!  They were called cabinet makers because the room in the house for which they made things was called the cabinet.  Like pro office of today.

Yum…Something Smells Good!

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Blog post by Meghan – 5th grade

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Tavern:

Today we are dinning in the Shields Tavern for lunch.   They are serving salad as an appetizer.  The salad consists of carrots, purple and green lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, and ranch dressing. The main course is chicken pot pie.    The pie consists of carrots, potatoes, peas, chicken and a gravy dressing.  Some of my friends were not very fond of this meal, but they found they liked it once they gave it a taste.  It is served with rolls and butter.   They have now just served us a delicious dessert of home made vanilla ice cream.  It has a nice taste and everyone ate it in just a few bites.

In Colonial times, you would come to a tavern while on a trip.   They would allow 5-6 people to sleep in one bed.  Once those were full people would sleep on the floor.  We all enjoyed our amazing lunch at the Shields Tavern.  We felt at home and as if we were living in Colonial times.

Gunsmith Visit

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Post by Nick – 4th Grade

Today we learned a lot of things in Williamsburg.  One particular thing I want to talk about is the Gunsmith.  First when we went in, I saw a lot of stuff, but I learned quickly they didn’t just make guns.  They made guns, cutlery and  foundry.

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GUNS:

To make a rifle, it would take up to a year!  The rifles made here were for hunters and not for war.  I found out there are differences between rifles and shotguns.   Rifles are grooved on the inside and shotguns are smooth.

CUTLERY:

My favorite part of the visit was the swords.  She called this a form of cutlery.  Other cutlery objects are knives, scissors and axes.

FOUNDRY:

They made molds for spoons and belt buckles for horses.   To make the molds, they would heat the metal and then pour it into the molds.    When they are finished, they freeze it for it to set.   Then they would heat it again to make the form.

They didn’t just make things, they also repaired things like guns and swords.

Yorktown

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When we first came into Yorktown we saw 13 flags in a circle representing the 13 original colonies.  We met with our guide to talk about the Sugar Act and Tea Act.   The Sugar Act is the Act that put a tax on all paper goods, like this deck of cards.   The tea act taxed all the tea.   The colonists didn’t like the tax.

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Next we went to see how Continental soldiers lived during the war.   Six men would live in one small tent.   Six volunteers from our group tried it out and they said it was very uncomfortable because of the space and the dirt floors.

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We also got to see and hear a real cannon fire.  The reenactors told us the process of loading and firing a cannon and then told us to cover our ears.

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Next we went to explore the lives of a middle class farmer.  We saw their house that had all the rooms that were in a normal house with the exception of the kitchen.  It was very small!  All the rooms were in one room.  The kitchen isn’t in the main house because smoke from the kitchen doesn’t smell good.   There was also the chance of setting the house on fire.   To solve that problem, the kitchen is outside of the main living area.

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We also visited the tobacco barn outside.   Tobacco was hanging from the ceilings to dry.  Tobacco was a cash crop in Virginia.   Middle class farmers would have 1-2 slaves, who would sleep in this building.  We learned about how they sold the tobacco.  They would get tobacco tickets when trading their tobacco in.  They would take this ticket to a local merchant for trade to get household items they needed.  The merchant would then give the tickets to the ship captains as a trade, and then the captain, when arriving in England, would turn the tickets in for other items or money.  This was a true bartering system.

 

Yorktown Photos

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Roomies

Roomies

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Surrender Field

Surrender Field

Surrender Field

Surrender Field

Surrender Field

Surrender Field

Roomies

Roomies

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Yorktown

Yorktown

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

Purple Shirts

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Even More?

Even More?

Even more?

Even more?

more?

more?

How many soldiers can sleep in one tent?

How many soldiers can sleep in one tent?

Dixie students know ALL answers

Dixie students know ALL answers

Accommodations for our soldiers

Accommodations for our soldiers

Taxes! Taxes! Taxes!

Taxes! Taxes! Taxes!

Experience the Stamp Act

Experience the Stamp Act

Our Guide - Amazing!

Our Guide – Amazing!

Feel the Sun

Feel the Sun

5 second rest break

5 second rest break

Yorktown Guide?

Yorktown Guide?

5 second  rest break

5 second rest break

Loyal Patriot

Loyal Patriot

5 second break

5 second break

Weaving a tent for the Continental Army

Weaving a tent for the Continental Army

Future Photographer

Future Photographer

Spinning

Spinning

Weaving a tent for the Continental Army

Weaving a tent for the Continental Army

Colorful Choices

Colorful Choices

Rebus.  Can you read it?

Rebus. Can you read it?

Gunsmith

Gunsmith

Gunsmith

Gunsmith

I love doors!

I love doors!

Gunsmith

Gunsmith

Our beloved guide Bob

Our beloved guide Bob

Serene Street

Serene Street

Cabinet Maker Shop

Cabinet Maker Shop

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